The first day back to work after a Monday holiday can be a bit nerve-wrecking. It can cause the mind to shut down and the creativity to escape for more desirable climate.

So, in struggling to find a topic for this evening’s blog, I started noticing that one word kept popping in my head.

It’s not much of a word. It’s nothing, really.

No, it’s nothing.

The word, the topic, is nothing.

It’s a word we use often, especially us women, usually following the inquiry, “What’s wrong?” “Nothing,” we say. But nothing is always something.

It’s the response when we scold our children, “What have you been doing?” “Nothing,” the innocent-looking scoundrels say. We know, though, that there’s always something behind the nothing.

My favorite use of the word — nothing — is the famed poem by Robert Frost, which could probably be recited by every fan of the ’80s movie The Outsiders.

When Ponyboy and Johnny escape to the country after accidentally killing a another teen, Ponyboy reads the poem to Johnny, who later interprets the poem in a letter read after he dies.

This is the poem, “Nothing Gold Can Stay”:

Nature’s first green is gold
Her hardest hue to hold.
Her early leaf’s a flower;
But only so an hour.
Then leaf subsides to leaf.
So Eden sank to grief,
So dawn goes down to day.
Nothing gold can stay.

I have my own ideas about what this poem is about, but I have to say that opinion may be tainted by the dozens and dozens of times I watched the movie.

Much of poem interpretation is subjective, and I’d be interested in reading your thoughts.

It seems there is something to say about nothing.